It takes talent! (A Tree Grows in Azeroth – Part 2)

Looking back at things, I realize where I went wrong.

When I finally gave in and tried WoW out, I had such a good time with the experience of it, that I just wanted to play. I didn’t want to learn such silly things as class mechanics.

It took me perhaps five or ten *cough* levels after getting talents to realize I had points to invest. I was having fun, though, dammit!

So, I saw all these tasty points and thought to myself, “Well, let’s see… I like THIS and THIS and THIS… OH! That looks nice!”

I felt like I was at the farmer’s market on a summer morning, and saw all this tasty produce in front of me. Sure, I have no clue what this weird vegetable is, but I’ll find something to make with it, I’M SURE.

My brother-in-law whispered me in-game, and asked me what spec I wanted to play. Did I ask what he meant by that? No. I saw myself as a Orcish Army Knife. Why pigeonhole me as one thing or the other? SPECIALIZATION is for noobs!

Let’s just pass over this part, though:

He asked, “Are you going to be balance?”

I thought, “But… I do have my talent points balanced.”

Yep. Let’s move right along, nothing to see here!

After being yelled at for a horrible spec (at that precise moment, I still wasn’t sure how he knew I had such a bad spec), I trundled off to Thunder Bluff and spent a little of my hard-earned silver on a respec.

Even after I did that, I still wasn’t exactly a student of the talent trees. I still was too stubborn to really understand how your spec choices influence the best way to play your character.

Of course, I look back at things and can’t believe I made it that difficult. However, with great struggles come great things. Right? Right??

The other day, I was taking my young Worgen through Wailing Caverns. The tank dinged. I provided my congratulations, then we sat. And sat. And sat.

The tank then said, “Sorry, talent point.”

I cheerfully told him no worries, as I chuckled to myself,  “Taking all that time to choose that ONE talent point. That noob.”

Oh, wait. DAMMIT. *grumble*

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5 responses to “It takes talent! (A Tree Grows in Azeroth – Part 2)

  1. I’m pretty sure most of us have had a similar experience at some point while playing WoW.

    My first character was a Warrior, and while I realized she had talent points before level 15, I never really “got” the whole “focus on one tree” thing. So, I had a weird combination of some talents from all three trees, and … well, let’s just say I try to remember that when I run into someone who doesn’t seem to know what they’re doing. :)

    Anyway, take heart: You’re not alone in having a secret noobish past!

  2. Pingback: Tweets that mention It takes talent! « Red Noob Diaries -- Topsy.com

  3. Oh geez, I can really relate to this post. I was so lost when I first started the game. I thought I had to put ALL my talents in the same tree. It was much later before I realized I should be picking up a few in prot/ ret, too.

    I think the system now must be easier for newcomers.

  4. Ha ha ha- when we started out, my druid turned into a bear while I- a Holy priest- took the damage. We figured that made sense because I could heal myself, and thus distract them while he savaged their faces off!

  5. I was determined not to screw up my talent choice selection on my first character – after all, resetting them cost valuable money I couldn’t spare! – so I actually made it all the way to 20 without spending a single one, agonizing over various options and choices. There’s something pure and awesome about the early game experience when everything is so new and exciting, isn’t there? :)

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